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The Otome Gaming Jargon

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default The Otome Gaming Jargon

Post by Makise Sunao on 22/04/13, 04:39 pm

There are many words/terms used by people playing Otome games that makes newbies nosebleeding by the adopted Japanese words fans use. There are even people mistakenly put B/L and Otome Games as the same genre.

Feel free to add words and definitions that I've missed :D

Please do not copy this and paste them without crediting the authors.

General Terms
I love you Otome Game - Games that are mainly targeted for girls in visual novel format. Depicts GirlXBoy Romance.
I love you  Visual Novel - An interactive game that is written in novel style, depicted in pictures, choices, and dialogues.
I love you OELVN -[Original English Visual Novel] - Visual Novels that were made by non-Japanese people.
I love you  Reverse Harem - Where groups of guys flock around one girl.
I love you Harem - Where groups of girls flock around one guy.
I love you B/L- Boys love game. Depicts romance between boys.
I love you  Otoge- Shortfut for Otome Game
I love you  Bishouge - Shortcut for Bishoujo Game

Gaming Terms
Star Pink Walkthrough - A guide on how to win the game
Star Pink Capture Guide - A synonym for Walkthrough. Comes from the Japanese term for walkthroughs which is 攻略 kouryaku (literally 'capture')
Star Pink Routes - Different endings, outcomes after certain choices.
Star Pink MC - Main Character - The heroine, the one you'll be playing as.
Star Pink CG - Computer Graphics, its original meaning is changed, but in otome games it's refererred to as "a still picture(s) of chracter depicting a special event"
Star Pink Sprite - The face/body of the character you interact with.
Star Pink BGM - Background Music
Star Pink Seiyuu - Voice Actor/Actress
Star PinkPlatform - The type of device compatible with the game.

Types of Platforms:
Star Pink PS2
Star Pink PS3
Star Pink PC
:star:NDS
Star Pink 3DS
Star Pink GBA
Star Pink PSP
Star Pink iOS - Apple Phone/Tablet
Star Pink Android

Types of Otome Games
Blue Star Simulation - otome games with statistic raising, minigames and other more "game-like" elements. Supposed to 'simulate' real life in a way.
Blue Star RPG - Role playing game, involves moving a 2d/3d character and interact with other characters in the game.
Blue Star ADV/AVG - ADV the shortened from "adventure" and AVG is the shortened form of "adventure game". ADV is popular format of visual novels that are also the most common  released every year. ADVs are characterised by little-to-no interactive gameplay, centrering around a "choose-your-own-adventure" narrative style. The player is intermittently prompted to make decisions from a set group of choices to advance the plot and eventually reach an ending.
The amount and frequency of choices vary from game-to-game. ADVs always feature multiple endings, and are widely loved by its fans because of its high replay value. Again, the amount of endings are dependent upon each game.
Blue Star Eroge (エロゲ; エロゲー) - An eroge is a genre and a general term of reference to visual novels and dating sims for adults that feature pornographic content in an anime style. Nearly all of the "obtainable" characters are bishoujo and bishounen. Because of how much of a blanket term eroge is, most prefer to market their releases through its subgenres.
Examples being nukige and calling otome games for adults "R18+ otome games" rather than just "eroge". The word is a portmanteau of "erotic game".
Blue Star Ongaku Game (音楽ゲーム; おんがくゲーム) - Means "music game" in Japanese. Often shortened to "otoge (音ゲー; おとゲー)" or "onge (おんゲー)". Also known as a "rhythm game (リズムゲーム)". An ongaku game is a type of computer game in which the gameplay is centred around keeping in rhythm with the music in order to progress.
Popular examples include Konami's Dance Dance Revolution franchise, and Nintendo's Rhytm Tengoku (Rhythm Heaven) series. Be careful to not confuse otoge with "otome game", as both share the same shortened form.


MALE Traits / Stereotypes / Personality:
Spoiler:

Banchou
Leaders of a group of Yankees (delinquents). The ring leader.

Biseinen (美青年)
Means "beautiful young man" in Japanese. Biseinen is a general term for a "pretty" young man. Biseinen is the better term to use when describing an attractive man who is under 18, as "bishounen" is a word used to describe younger boys, such as those still in high school. This is since "seinen" refers to young men, and "shounen" refers to young boys. Biseinen tend to be on the "prettier" side of attractiveness, but is still used as a term to describe any young man that is attractive in general.

Bishounen (美少年)
The literal meaning is "beaitiful young boy." As such, this is a term used to refer to "pretty" boys or male teenagers, rather than young men (let's say men that are 18+). A good English equivalent is "pretty boy". The popularity of this word amongst Western fans gave birth to its affectionate "nickname", "bishie". Western fans commonly use bishounen and bishie to refer to any attractive man, regardless of his age or the type of his attractiveness.

Cherry Boy
A young man who is a virgin. Its origins aren't completely known, but it may have something to do with the Western slang, "popping your cherry".

Dandere (ダンデレ)
A dandere is a character that is initially and/or outwardly quiet and silent (coming
off as "emotionless"), but when around the right people, they're revealed to be sweet and loving. More often than not, a dandere is just shy. More commonly applied in romantic relationships, but can be used in friendships as well. A part of the "-dere" family, the word is a mashup of the Japanese words "danmari (黙り)", which means "silence; taciturnity" and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

Deredere (デレデレ)
A deredere character is one whom is completely lovestruck, often right from the moment they realise their affection for their love interest.

Do-M (ドM)
A Do-M character is one whom is very masochistic. Also refers to media which feature such characters and themes. Comes from the Japanese prefix "do", which means "extremely; incredibly; very" and the "m" from "masochist(ic)".

Do-S (ドS)
A Do-S character is one whom is very sadistic. Also refers to media which feature such characters and themes. Comes from the Japanese prefix "do", which means "extremely; incredibly; very" and the "s" from "sadist(ic)".

Doutei (童貞)
Means virgin. Though the word can be used for a virgin of both genders, but it is much more commonly used for male virgins.

Haraguro (腹黒)
A more recent term, a haraguro character is one who has an outward appearance of being amicable, friendly, innocent, kind and/or refreshing, but uses any combination of the aforementioned traits to hide their real cruel, cunning, evil, manipulative, mean and/or sadistic side. Despite the negative connotation, not all haraguro are villainous or are sociopaths. Their motives vary very widely depending upon the character her/himself and the "seriousness" of the story. The term comes from the Japanese word, "Haraguroi (腹黒い)", which means "black-hearted; mean; scheming". As you can see, the fans merely dropped the "i" to create the term.

Kouhai (後輩)
A kouhai is a junior at school or work. A good English equivalent is "underclassman." In a school setting, a kouhai is somebody below your grade. However, in Japan, an underclassman/junior at work does not need to be referred to as [last name]-kouhai, unlike a senpai, whom are almost always referred to as "[last name]-senpai". In a workplace environment, a kouhai isn't always somebody whom is younger than you. Let's say that I'm older than Kinose-san, but since Kinose-san came first, I am Kinose-san's "kouhai". I would respectfully refer to him as "Kinose-senpai", unless he otherwise states a preference for being called something else.

Kuudere (クーデレ)
A kuudere character is aloof, cold, icy, stoic, etc. around everyone else, but show a kinder, warmer and even loving side towards the right people. A lot of the time, a kuudere's frosty attitude has ties to desires to push people away from them. More commonly seen in romantic relationships, but can be used in friendships as well. A recent part of the "-dere" family, the term is a mashup of the English word "cool" (written as "クール" in Japanese), which means "calm and collected" and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

Megane (めがね/メガネ/ 眼鏡)
"Megane" itself means "glasses". This is the generalised term for characters of any gender that wear glasses, and/or this is considered to be one of their defining attractive traits (for example, you wouldn't call an otaku with glasses a "megane", unless they were attractive and not at all like the otaku stereotype). Although, "megane" is also commonly used as a gender-specific of this archetype for men. It's also a loose Japanese equivalent of the English for "glasses fetishism". In addition, the definition can be slightly different depending upon the bespectacled character's gender. For example:

Meganekko (メガネっ娘/メガネっ子): The specific term for females. It also encompasses the definition of "megane", but has its own connotations. A stereotypical meganekko is geeky and intelligent. They tend to love books and are quiet. Meganekko are known to overlap with "dojikko" traits often. Fans do sometimes refer to male megane as "meganekko" due to affection or misuse.

Megane-danshi (-男子)/Megane-kun (-君)/Megane-otoko (-男): Is the male-specific term. It also encompasses the definitions of "megane", but has its own additional meanings. The common characterisations of megane-danshi are broader than the meganekko. Some megane-danashi are more like meganekko- book-loving, geeky, intelligent and/or quiet. Just as many other portrayals feature intelligence, but also coldness and sadism. However, the latter types of megane-danshi are better known as "Kichiku megane".

Nekketsu (熱血)
"Nekketsu" means "hot-blooded" in Japanese. There are no significant differences
between what a hot-blooded character is like in Japanese media vs. Western media.

Nikushoku-kei (肉食系)
The opposite of "Soushoku-kei danshi". "Nikushoku" means "carnivorous", and "-kei" means "type". "Nikushoku-kei" refers to men that are aggressive, competitive and forward in their pursuit of women, sex and money. A good English equivalent is "a man's man". In fiction, the Nikushoku-kei overlaps with the Ore-sama type often.


Ore-sama (俺様; オレ様)
Ore-sama is a term used to refer to overconfident and/or pompous male characters. The term comes from the Japanese masculine pronoun for "I; me (俺 or オレ)" and the very respectful honorific suffix, "-sama". As such, the majority of ore-sama type characters use "ore-sama", which is the most arrogant way a male can refer to himself. Other than being overconfident and pompous, ore-sama characters are also known to be boastful, hasty and having a "my way or the highway" attitude. More  common amongst villainous characters.

Ouji-sama (王子様; おうじ様)
Ouji-sama is literally the Japanese for very respectfully addressing or referring to a prince. Even so, not all ouji-sama characters are princes or even royalty. This character archetype is more referential to the stereotypes associated with a prince: "pretty boy" attractiveness, gentlemanliness, politeness, wealth, high social standing (through nobility or popularity), a silver tongue and/or even knightly virtues if the universe the character is in permits. It is not uncommon for ouji-sama characters to also be combined with the "playboy" stereotype; however, the ouji-sama is much more savoury about his trysts.

Sanpaku-gan (三白眼)
Literally means "three white eyes" in Japanese. Commonly referred to as just "Sanpaku" or "Sanpaku eyes". Those with Sanpaku-gan have smaller irises, which results in a look where the sclera (the white part) makes up for a greater portion of their eyes. Wikipedia's definition is more detailed, which also serves to explain the origin of the term:
Wikipedia's article wrote:The term refers to the iris being rather small, so that it only covers about two-thirds or less of the vertical axis of the eye; e.g. delineate an eye into four portions; the iris would only occupy one portion of the divided four sections; thus leaving the other three in white, hence "three whites".
Because Sanpaku-gan produces a more "piercing and sharp" look that lacks cuteness, Japanese fiction tends to apply it to aggressive, delinquents, and/or violent characters. If not necessarily antagonistic and villainous, they're just "rough-around-the-edges". Can also be used to make an older character look more mature, in which it becomes especially more noticeable in a cast with predominantly "cuter-looking" characters. Examples
Spoiler:

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Left: Takasu Ryuuji from Toradora! Right: L from Death Note.


Soushoku-kei danshi (草食系 男子)

The opposite of "Nikushoku-kei". Soushoku" means "herbivorous", "-kei" means "type" and "danshi" means "man." The term was coined by Fukasawa Maki, in which "herbivore" was used for types of men that don't have aggressive desires for "flesh", unlike the standard "carnivorous" men. Soushoku-kei danshi, often referred to as just "Soushoku danshi", are (typically) young men that are more peaceable in their pursuit of women, sex and money, unlike the typical male stereotype of being competitive and aggressive. These types of men are typically kind, cooperative and family-oriented. It can also be used as an insult, referring to "spineless" guys that pretend to not be interested in women and sex for fear of rejection, and do not make any moves themselves. According to Wikipedia, it also refers to a phenomenon in Japan where men are shunning relationships and marriage. This has caused a decline in the nation's birth rates, and is projected to become an issue in the future.

Senpai (also written as "Sempai") (先輩)
A character's "senpai" is their senior at school or work. A good English equivalent of senpai is "upperclassman". When combined with a name, such as "Kanakubo-senpai", the speaker is literally saying "Kanakubo upperclassman", but is simply indicating respect towards their senior.In a school setting, a [Name]-senpai is always how an upperclassman should be referred to unless you're close to them. A senpai doesn't necessarily have to be older than the addresser. For example, in a workplace, Kinose-san is younger than me but he has been working there for two years. So out of respect and politeness, I'd refer to Kinose-san as "Kinose-senpai", especially if he's showing me the ropes.

Shota (ショタ)
The shortened form of "shotacon". However, shota is commonly used more as an adjective to describe a character's appearance. For example, I wouldn't call Haruki-san a "shotacon", because that sounds like I'm implying he likes very young-looking guys. Instead, I would refer to him as a shota, since I'm trying to get across
that he looks cute, innocent, young, etc. and appeals to the shotacon demographic.

Shotacon (ショタコン)
A shotacon is a term that describes media that feature themes about attraction to younger boys (or at least, older guys that look much more like younger boys), or targets those that are attracted towards such male characters. It is also used as an adjective to describe somebody whom is a fan of shotacon material. The term is a shortened mashup coming from a its original name, "Shoutarou Complex (正太コンプレックス)". Please note that "shota" is the correct term to use to describe a character whom fits the definition's mould.

Sports-baka (スポーツ馬鹿; -バカ)
A sports-baka is a character whom is totally devoted to and loves sports. The term itself can encompass a lover of any type of sport. Stereotypically, a sports-baka excels in any manner of sporting or physical activity, but tends to not be booksmart or even smart full stop. Sometimes, some people will specify the type of sport the
character is devoted to. For example, soccer-baka and tennis-baka. The word comes from combining "sports" and the Japanese word, "馬鹿 (fool; idiot; stupid)".

Tsundere (ツンデレ)

A tsundere is a character whom starts off with a hostile attitude (be it physically and/or verbally), but shows their sweeter side (often caring, kind and loving) when they open up around the right people. Most commonly, this archetype applies to
romantic situations. However, it can also apply to friendships. The best-known member of "-dere" family, the term is a mashup of the Japanese words "tsuntsun (ツンツン)", which means "irritable; pointy", and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

Tsundere can be broken down into three "types":

Type A
: They're "tsun" around others but "dere" around the right people. This is the most common one, and is also referred to as "Classic Tsundere".
Type B: They're "dere" or otherwise on the significantly friendlier side, but around the people they like, they're "tsun". Despite this pattern technically being "dere-tsun", it's still called "tsundere".
Type C: They alternate between "tsun" and "dere" when around selected loved ones. Most of the time, a Type C's default attitude towards everyone is "tsun". More common in romantic relationships than friendships. Type C is a more recent incarnation, and is sometimes called "Modern Tsundere".

Yandere (ヤンデレ)
A yandere is a character that is initially caring, kind, loving, sweet, etc. and tends to appear cute and innocent... but their (often) genuine love for the object of their affection becomes psychologically destructive. Their behaviour can depend on which "type" of yandere they are, but the end results are usually criminally insane and/or violent. Also not exclusively a term for romantic relationships, but is seen much more often in them. A popular part of the "-dere" family, the term is a mashup of the Japanese words "yanderu (病んでる)", which means "to fall or be ill (in this context, mentally ill)" and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

You may have noticed that this behavioural pattern is more "dere-yan", but most likely for phonetic reasons, it is always "yandere". It's also worth noting that yandere is not a blanket term to describe an insane person that is lovestruck around the right people. The emphasis is on the loving-mentally destructive dynamic rather than the specifics of their insanity.

A yandere comes in two main types, but many alternate or are both:

Obsessive: These yandere get completely obsessed with the love interest, to mentally unstable degrees. Obsessive yandere tend to stalk their love interests for every little information about them they can get. They also can go to extreme lengths to "get rid of the competition", which often results in violence.

Possessive: Possessive yandere are so in love with their love interest, that they
become insanely possessive, and in extreme cases, totally unwilling to allow their interest to spend time with others. Possessive yandere do stalk as well, but usually to keep tabs on their love interests. This type of yandere commonly end up imprisoning their love interests. In more violent endings, they kill their love to prevent others from "taking them away".

Yankee (ヤンキー)
Yankee is used to describe an individual who is a juvenile delinquent. Without
application to a person, yankee on its own refers to delinquency in general.

FEMALE Traits / Stereotypes / Personality:
Spoiler:
Bijo (美女)
Meaning "beautiful woman" in Japanese, bijo is a word used to describe a beautiful female, regardless of her age.

Bishoujo (美少女)
The word literally means "beautiful young girl". It is a Japanese word that refers to
attractive young women. A young woman can be a different "type" of attractive (cute, sexy, etc.) and still be correctly referred to as a bishoujo. In the Western fandom, bishoujo is used to describe a lady as attractive regardless of her age, but the more correct term for a beautiful "older" lady would be "bijo", which is a general term to refer to an attractive woman.

Dojikko (ドジっ子; ドジっ娘)
A dojikko is a female character that is clumsy, but rather than being a flaw, it is seen or played as more of an endearing trait. Though a feminine term, it is not uncommon to see clumsy male characters being referred to as a dojikko by their female fans. The word is a mashup of the Japanese words, "ドジ (clumsy)" and "子 (child)"/"娘 (young girl)".

Donkan (鈍感; ドンカン)
Means "thickheadedness; emotionally dense" in Japanese. In other words, a donkan character tends to be slow on the uptake with jokes, doesn't realise when somebody has feelings for another (including themselves) and doesn't always realise they've been insulted. The donkan character archetype is a popular choice of protagonists for many visual novels.

Fujoshi (腐女子)
Literally meaning "rotten girl", a fujoshi is a fan of media featuring yaoi. Fujoshi is sometimes seen as the female equivalent of "otaku", but this is inaccurate. As well as being fans of yaoi, fujoshi are just as well known for their prolificness in creating doujins/fanworks of established series pairing canon male characters together- a lot of the time, of a pornographic nature. Unlike otaku, which is a term that was never intended to be negative, fujoshi is a self-mocking term, created by fans of yaoi.

Though not nearly as stigmatised as otaku are, fujoshi are steadily gaining unpopularity. A couple of crimes have made fujoshi stereotyped to be much creepier than their jocular beginnings. One is the incident in which a middle-aged (alleged) fujoshi threated a school and male seiyuu, Hayami Shou, with knives. Another incident was where Tachibana Shinnosuke, a popular seiyuu amongst fujoshi, begged his fans to stop stalking him after many of them orchestrated "accidental encounters" with him.

Moe (萌え)
Moe is a very broad term to describe a character (usually female) that is cute and tickles one's protective instincts. The word "moe" in Japanese means to "sprout; bud". Moe also can be used to describe a media that induces such feelings in you, or media that features many "moe" characters. A very popular example of a "moe" anime is K-On!

The application of "moe" to a character is acceptable to be subjective about it, but there are also thought to be specific patterns or personality traits a character must possess in order to "qualify". For female characters, the popular consensus is that they must be cute and young. Clumsiness, density, innocence and quirkiness are also desirable "moe" traits.

Endings
Clover Good End - An ok ending, but you've missed an imporant CG. It's because you made one or two mistakes in your choices.
Clover True End - The ending where they reveal most of the unanswered questions in the plot.
Clover Bad End  - Worst ending, usually someone dies or no one wins.
Clover Normal End - The ending with no romance. It mainly depicts the MC's life.

Other/General Terms
Spoiler:

Boys' Love (commonly abbreviated to just "BL")
BL is a term used to describe media that features idealised heteronormative homosexual relationships between two attractive men, whom are usually classified as "bishounen"/"biseinen". BL is also the general term to refer to any homosexual media that is designed to appeal to a female audience, unlike the more specific terms, "yaoi" and "shounen-ai". BL is almost always created for and by heterosexual women.

In most BL, the two males featured are typically divided into two main character archetypes, "seme" and "uke". The "seme" is the dominant guy, and is the one who makes the moves on the "uke". The seme tend to look more masculine than the uke. The "uke" is the submissive guy of the relationship, and typically has a "cuter" appearance and feminised personality. He is nearly always smaller in stature than the seme. In sexual situations, the seme "tops" the uke.

Bishoujo Game (美少女ゲーム)
Also known as galge. Meaning "pretty girl game" in Japanese, a bishoujo game is a subgenre of visual novels and dating sims that feature bishoujo girls as obtainable love interests. Bishoujo games are marketed towards a heterosexual male demographic. It is important to note that not all bishoujo games feature pornographic content. For example, Clannad, a very popular bishoujo game visual novel, is for all ages. Even though it was targeted towards a heterosexual male audience, its widespread popularity eventually boasted a varied demographic of fans.

Gal Game (ギャルゲーム)
Gal game means "girl game" in Japanese. It's much more commonly shortened to "galge (ギャルゲ; ギャルゲー)". Galge is a synonym for bishoujo game. Please scroll back above and read the entry for "bishoujo game" for more details.

Hanme (半目)
Literally means "half eyes" in Japanese. Hanme are eyes that are drawn in such a way that the top lid is flat and straight, and commonly, irises are coloured lighter to produce a "tired, half-conscious" look. Like jitome, hanme can be "permanent" or "temporary". Permanent hanme are common in characters that are aloof, gloomy, kuudere, lazy and/or always tired. Sometimes can be found in carefree and laidback types. Common causes of temporary hanme include, but aren't limited to:
~ Drowsiness
~ Tiredness
~ Being close to losing consciousness
~ When looking down upon somebody, both figuratively and literally.
Often confused with "jitome", especially since the two can overlap. However, hanme don't have the characteristic "frown" that jitome tend to. Also, the personality types the permanent varities tend to have are different. Examples:
Spoiler:

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Both are examples of "permanent" hanme. Left: Spanner from Katekyo Hitman Rebon. Right: Makise Kurisu from Steins;Gate.
Jitome (ジト目)
A character with jitome is one who is glaring or staring with disgust, reproach and/or scorn. Jitome is characterised by the top lid being drawn on a flat, straight angle to produce a "blunt" look, and often accompanied with a frown of varying degrees of "sharpness". From what I've been reading and seeing, jitome, tareme and tsurime, tend to be temporary as it is a form of expression. However, some characters seem to have this expression all the time, and/or has personality types that make them prone to giving somebody jitome. Commonly applied to frosty characters, such as kuudere types. 
Can get confused with "hanme", because it's possible for a character to have both. Jitome are nearly always accompanied by a frown, and usually an icy and abrasive personality. Jitome has a "being glared at" kind of feel, whereas hanme are often blank and "hollow" looking. The word is thought to have originated from the portmanteau of the Japanese words, "じと~ (the "onomatopoeia" of somebody glaring intently) and " (eyes)". Examples:
Spoiler:

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Both are examples of "temporary" jitome. Left: Orifushi Mafuyu from Kanojo x Kanojo x Kanojo. Her usual expression is that of an "aloof, emotionless" type. Right: Ibara Mayaka from Hyouka. This is not her usual expression, but she is prone to jitome because of her personality.

Protagonist (主人公)
Because while everyone knows what a protagonist is, I don't know about you guys, but when I first started out for the longest time I was convinced that 主人公 must either be a really popular name or that it must be kanji for [insert name here] XD

Bacouple (バカップル)
Japanese portmanteau combining 'baka' and 'couple' used as slang to indicate a ridiculously lovey-dovey couple.

Bara (薔薇)
Bara refers to male-on-male media typically made by and for homosexual men. In bara works, the artistic designs of the men tend to be muscular and their personalities more traditionally masculine. The word itself  literally means "rose" in Japanese.

Otaku (おたく; オタク; ヲタク)
An often misapplied and misused term, otaku is derived from the Japanese word, "お宅 (an honorific used to refer to another's family or house)". However, in this context (written as "おたく; オタク; ヲタク" to avoid confusion with "お宅"), it simply refers to somebody that has an extreme interest in their hobby/interest. In more modern times, the term has come to be near-exclusively used to describe those that are  obsessed with anime, manga, video games and/or visual novels. Though the definition itself is neutral- being neither positive nor negative- otaku is commonly viewed as an insult. There are a myriad of reasons why otaku are "silently" discriminated against in Japan and received its negative connotation. Some small reasons being their supposed tendencies to be asocial, hikkikomori, NEETs, unkempt, etc. As for why otaku get quickly categorised as a "creep" is explained in fantastic detail by a Japanese otaku here(may be graphic for some, please be aware!), but I'll simplify it way more for this post.

PLEASE BE WARNE
D:
I will briefly discuss some details about graphic crimes, so if you're sensitive to these matters, be mindful of this before you decide to read!
Spoiler:

Very basically, in 1988~'89, one of the most infamous crimes in Japanese history was committed by an alledgedly "lolicon" anime otaku named Miyazaki Tsutomu. He murdered four girls aged between 4~7 and even cannibalised, drank the blood of, raped and/or sexually mutilated some of them. In addition to those atrocities, he burned the skull of one of his victims to ash, sent them back to her parents and left a note that read, "Mari, Body Ashes, Burned, Evidence, Proof". He then sent letters to newspapers detailing graphically how he murdered his victims. After Mari's funeral,
he sent a letter to Mari's family and the newspapers that read, "I deeply appreciate the proper burial that you were able to provide her that I could not."
After Miyazaki was apprehended, numerous hentai (anime pornography) videos of lolicon and/or violent nature was supposedly found in a search of his home (alongside videos of himself committing the crimes). Needless to say, the public went mad, and a moral panic towards otaku spreads through the country. Years on, the panic disappeared, but the image that otaku are "creepy loners/f***ed up/lolicon freaks" remains.

Shoujo-ai (少女愛)
Meaning "young girl love", shoujo-ai is the term used to describe works that focuses on the romantic emotional developments between lesbians. At most, shoujo-ai may contain implied sex, but never anything pornographic.

Shounen-ai (少年愛)
Meaning "young boy love" in Japanese, shounen-ai refers to media that has an emphasis on the romantic emotional developments between men. It differentiates from yaoi by not including sex, but it can sometimes contain references to implied sex.

Yaoi (ヤオイ; やおい)
Yaoi is a term used to describe male-on-male homoerotic pornography created by and for heterosexual females. The term derived from "(山[場]なし, 落ちなし, 意味なし), which translates to "No peak, no fall, no meaning"; describing yaoi's focus on the sexual aspects. For the term used to describe male-on-male media that focuses more on the emotional aspects, "shounen-ai" is used.

Yuri (百合; ユリ; ゆり)
Yuri a term coined by the anime fandom to refer to media with a focus on lesbian pornography and/or themes. Yuri can also have focuses on emotional developments, which is often categorised as "shoujo-ai". The word means "lily" in Japanese.[/quote]

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Post by alice3ify on 22/04/13, 05:36 pm

Going to hop into the wagon and write a couple of things!

Tsundere: Is a person who is very sarcastic / cold / blunt / rude in front of people (mainly to the protagonist) but deep inside, that person is actually very caring, gentle to the person who she/he cares deeply. This comes from the term of 'tsun-tsun', for the cold attitude, and 'dere-dere' for the nice attitude.

Yandere: Is a person who, to a certain extend kill for the sake of his/her loved ones. Mentally disturbed, imo, but still irresistable in any case

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Post by Eryx on 22/04/13, 05:46 pm

I might be wrong so feel free to correct me. ^^;;

Yandere - Appears harmless and friendly yet possessive and/or obsessive to their object of affection. Their methods are extreme to the point when they go as far as killing.

Senpai - Upperclassman or someone senior in your field.

Kohai- Underclassman (sorry that's the initial word that came to my mind ^^;wink

And since you have Do-S on your list, you might want to add Do-M as well? smile

Endings:
True End can be the Best End too right? - The ending where they reveal most of the unanswered questions in the plot.

Good End - End where the MC ends up with a guy.

That's all I can think of now. ^^;;

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Post by Sakimichi on 22/04/13, 06:34 pm

Ouji - Literally translate as prince. Pretty boys that sparkle.
Bishounen - Pretty boy, usually described as a guy with female-ish facial structure.
Yankee - A delinquent guy, the black sheep of the story.
Shota - A guy with a childish personality, looks and is usually younger than the MC.
Dating Simulation - Simulates real life actions to improve certain attributes of the MC. Like taking a bath improves Beauty, studying improves intelligence, and working part time adds money to buy stuff to give for the guy.

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Post by Loren Leah on 22/04/13, 09:23 pm

to add to Sakimichi's above:

Simulation: otome game with stat raising, minigames and other more "game-like" elements. Supposed to 'simulate' real life in a way.

vs

ADV/Adventure: novel/choose your own adventure style otome game where you advance completely, or almost completely, by just picking choices or dialogue options. Much more reading than gameplay.

Capture Guide: A synonym for Walkthrough. Comes from the Japanese term for walkthroughs which is 攻略 kouryaku (literally 'capture')

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Post by Laramie Castiel on 23/04/13, 12:26 am

What great timing! Since I'm working on my upcoming otome gaming blog, I've been trying to collate the anime/manga fandom terms and a lot of them crosses over into the VN fandom. So I'll just copy-paste my definitions here without any regard to what has already been defined (since I CBB), and other words that may be helpful for newcomers to know:



~Traits / Stereotypes / Personality~

Biseinen (美青年)
Means "beautiful young man" in Japanese. Biseinen is a general term for a "pretty" young man. Biseinen is the better term to use when describing an attractive man who is 18 and over, as "bishounen" is a word used to describe younger boys, such as those still in high school. This is since "seinen" refers to young men, and "shounen" refers to young boys. Biseinen tend to be on the "prettier" side of attractiveness, but is still used as a term to describe any young man that is attractive in general.

Bishounen (美少年)
The literal meaning is "beaitiful young boy." As such, this is a term used to refer to "pretty" boys or male teenagers, rather than young men (let's say men that are 18+). A good English equivalent is "pretty boy". The popularity of this word amongst Western fans gave birth to its affectionate "nickname", "bishie". Western fans commonly use bishounen and bishie to refer to any attractive man, regardless of his age or the type of his attractiveness.

Boys' Love (commonly abbreviated to just "BL")

BL is a term used to describe media that features idealised heteronormative homosexual relationships between two attractive men, whom are usually classified as "bishounen"/"biseinen". BL is also the general term to refer to any homosexual media that is designed to appeal to a female audience, unlike the more specific terms, "yaoi" and "shounen-ai". BL is almost always created for and by heterosexual women.

In most BL, the two males featured are typically divided into two main character archetypes, "seme" and "uke". The "seme" is the dominant guy, and is the one who makes the moves on the "uke". The seme tend to look more masculine than the uke. The "uke" is the submissive guy of the relationship, and typically has a "cuter" appearance and feminised personality. He is nearly always smaller in stature than the seme. In sexual situations, the seme "tops" the uke.

Cherry Boy
A young man who is a virgin. Its origins aren't completely known, but it may have something to do with the Western slang, "popping your cherry".

Dandere (ダンデレ)
A dandere is a character that is initially and/or outwardly quiet and silent (coming
off as "emotionless"), but when around the right people, they're revealed to be sweet and loving. More often than not, a dandere is just shy. More commonly applied in romantic relationships, but can be used in friendships as well. A part of the "-dere" family, the word is a mashup of the Japanese words "danmari (黙り)", which means "silence; taciturnity" and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

Deredere (デレデレ)
A deredere character is one whom is completely lovestruck, often right from the moment they realise their affection for their love interest.

Do-M (ドM)
A Do-M character is one whom is very masochistic. Also refers to media which feature such characters and themes. Comes from the Japanese prefix "do", which means "extremely; incredibly; very" and the "m" from "masochist(ic)".

Do-S (ドS)
A Do-S character is one whom is very sadistic. Also refers to media which feature such characters and themes. Comes from the Japanese prefix "do", which means "extremely; incredibly; very" and the "s" from "sadist(ic)".

Doutei (童貞)
Means virgin. The word can be used for a virgin of both genders, but it is much more commonly used for male virgins.

Haraguro (腹黒)
A more recent term, a haraguro character is one who has an outward appearance of being amicable, friendly, innocent, kind and/or refreshing, but uses any combination of the aforementioned traits to hide their real cruel, cunning, evil, manipulative, mean and/or sadistic side. Despite the negative connotation, not all haraguro are villainous or are sociopaths. Their motives vary very widely depending upon the character her/himself and the "seriousness" of the story. The term comes from the Japanese word, "Haraguroi (腹黒い)", which means "black-hearted; mean; scheming". As you can see, the fans merely dropped the "i" to create the term.

Kouhai (後輩)
A kouhai is a junior at school or work. A good English equivalent is "underclassman." In a school setting, a kouhai is somebody below your grade. However, in Japan, an underclassman/junior at work does not need to be referred to as [last name]-kouhai, unlike a senpai, whom are almost always referred to as "[last name]-senpai". In a workplace environment, a kouhai isn't always somebody whom is younger than you. Let's say that I'm older than Kinose-san, but since Kinose-san came first, I am Kinose-san's "kouhai". I would respectfully refer to him as "Kinose-senpai", unless he otherwise states a preference for being called something else.

Kuudere (クーデレ)
A kuudere character is aloof, cold, icy, stoic, etc. around everyone else, but show a kinder, warmer and even loving side towards the right people. A lot of the time, a kuudere's frosty attitude has ties to desires to push people away from them. More commonly seen in romantic relationships, but can be used in friendships as well. A recent part of the "-dere" family, the term is a mashup of the English word "cool" (written as "クール" in Japanese), which means "calm and collected" and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

Megane (めがね/メガネ/ 眼鏡)
"Megane" itself means "glasses". This is the generalised term for characters of any gender that wear glasses, and/or this is considered to be one of their defining attractive traits (for example, you wouldn't call an otaku with glasses a "megane", unless they were attractive and not at all like the otaku stereotype). Although, "megane" is also commonly used as a gender-specific of this archetype for men. It's also a loose Japanese equivalent of the English for "glasses fetishism". In addition, the definition can be slightly different depending upon the bespectacled character's gender. For example:

Meganekko (メガネっ娘/メガネっ子): The specific term for females. It also encompasses the definition of "megane", but has its own connotations. A stereotypical meganekko is geeky and intelligent. They tend to love books and are quiet. Meganekko are known to overlap with "dojikko" traits often. Fans do sometimes refer to male megane as "meganekko" due to affection or misuse.

Megane-danshi (-男子)/Megane-kun (-君)/Megane-otoko (-男): Is the male-specific term. It also encompasses the definitions of "megane", but has its own additional meanings. The common characterisations of megane-danshi are broader than the meganekko. Some megane-danashi are more like meganekko- book-loving, geeky, intelligent and/or quiet. Just as many other portrayals feature intelligence, but also coldness and sadism. However, the latter types of megane-danshi are better known as "Kichiku megane".

Senpai (also written as "Sempai") (先輩)
A character's "senpai" is their senior at school or work. A good English equivalent of senpai is "upperclassman". When combined with a name, such as "Kanakubo-senpai", the speaker is literally saying "Kanakubo upperclassman", but is simply indicating respect towards their senior.In a school setting, a [Name]-senpai is always how an upperclassman should be referred to unless you're close to them. A senpai doesn't necessarily have to be older than the addresser. For example, in a workplace, Kinose-san is younger than me but he has been working there for two years. So out of respect and politeness, I'd refer to Kinose-san as "Kinose-senpai", especially if he's showing me the ropes.

Shota (ショタ)
The shortened form of "shotacon". However, shota is commonly used more as an adjective to describe a character's appearance. For example, I wouldn't call Haruki Naoshi from Starry Sky a "shotacon", because that sounds like I'm implying he likes very young-looking guys. Instead, I would refer to him as a shota, since I'm trying to get across that he looks cute, innocent, young, etc. and appeals to the shotacon demographic.

Shotacon (ショタコン)
A shotacon is a term that describes media that feature themes about attraction to younger boys (or at least, older guys that look much more like younger boys), or targets those that are attracted towards such male characters. It is also used as an adjective to describe somebody whom is a fan of shotacon material. The term is a shortened mashup coming from a its original name, "Shoutarou Complex (正太コンプレックス)". Please note that "shota" is the correct term to use to describe a character whom fits the definition's mould.

Tsundere (ツンデレ)

A tsundere is a character whom starts off with a hostile attitude (be it physically and/or verbally), but shows their sweeter side (often caring, kind and loving) when they open up around the right people. Most commonly, this archetype applies to
romantic situations. However, it can also apply to friendships. The best-known member of "-dere" family, the term is a mashup of the Japanese words "tsuntsun (ツンツン)", which means "irritable; pointy", and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

Tsundere can be broken down into three "types":

Type A
: They're "tsun" around others but "dere" around the right people. This is the most common one, and is also referred to as "Classic Tsundere".
Type B: They're "dere" or otherwise on the significantly friendlier side, but around the people they like, they're "tsun". Despite this pattern technically being "dere-tsun", it's still called "tsundere".
Type C: They alternate between "tsun" and "dere" when around selected loved ones. Most of the time, a Type C's default attitude towards everyone is "tsun". More common in romantic relationships than friendships. Type C is a more recent incarnation, and is sometimes called "Modern Tsundere".

Yandere (ヤンデレ)
A yandere is a character that is initially caring, kind, loving, sweet, etc. and tends to appear cute and innocent... but their (often) genuine love for the object of their affection becomes psychologically destructive. Their behaviour can depend on which "type" of yandere they are, but the end results are usually criminally insane and/or violent. Also not exclusively a term for romantic relationships, but is seen much more often in them. A popular part of the "-dere" family, the term is a mashup of the Japanese words "yanderu (病んでる)", which means "to fall or be ill (in this context, mentally ill)" and "deredere (デレデレ)", which means "lovestruck".

You may have noticed that this behavioural pattern is more "dere-yan", but most likely for phonetic reasons, it is always "yandere". It's also worth noting that yandere is not a blanket term to describe an insane person that is lovestruck around the right people. The emphasis is on the loving-mentally destructive dynamic rather than the specifics of their insanity.

A yandere comes in two main types, but many alternate or are both:

Obsessive: These yandere get completely obsessed with the love interest, to mentally unstable degrees. Obsessive yandere tend to stalk their love interests for every little information about them they can get. They also can go to extreme lengths to "get rid of the competition", which often results in violence.

Possessive: Possessive yandere are so in love with their love interest, that they
become insanely possessive, and in extreme cases, totally unwilling to allow their interest to spend time with others. Possessive yandere do stalk as well, but usually to keep tabs on their love interests. This type of yandere commonly end up imprisoning their love interests. In more violent endings, they kill their love to prevent others from "taking them away".


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Post by Hype on 23/04/13, 01:00 pm

Question: are Banchous and Yankees alike?
There was also a term to describe athletic bishous, i forgot though sad

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Post by Laramie Castiel on 23/04/13, 01:17 pm

Banchous and yankee (juvenile delinquents) are alike, in a sense. Banchous are leaders of a group of delinquents, whereas a "yankee" is a term that can be used to describe a juveline delinquent, or juvenile delinquency in general.

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Post by Hype on 23/04/13, 01:19 pm

Laramie Castiel wrote:Banchous and yankee (juvenile delinquents) are alike, in a sense. Banchous are leaders of a group of delinquents, whereas a "yankee" is a term that can be used to describe a juveline delinquent, or juvenile delinquency in general.
Thank you! Well I learned new things today
This forum is interesting :D

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Post by Laramie Castiel on 23/04/13, 01:23 pm

No worries! ;D

I plan on writing some more definitions out when I get extra time. Hopefully we can collate a variety of definitions and make this post a sticky, if it isn't one already.

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Post by Topaztan on 23/04/13, 01:31 pm

AHAHHAHA, LARAMIE YOU AND YOUR LISTS. <3

Hyperbending Body wrote:
There was also a term to describe athletic bishous, i forgot though :(
Sports-baka? I think I know which term you're thinking of but I don't remember at the moment either...

I'd add...

Friendship end: where the relationship doesn't work romantically but the two remain friends. (sometimes also a a path without romancing a male and just becoming best friends with another female.)

Reverse Harem/Harem: Where groups of the opposite gender flock around one person.

Otoge: "short" way of saying otome.

I can't think of anything, LOL

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Post by Laramie Castiel on 23/04/13, 01:40 pm

WHY U LAUGHING AT ME TOPAZ I THOUGHT WHAT WE HAD WAS REAL! xD

There are a few more I can add sometime tomorrow. Man, listing is so fun! People think I'm totally joking, but I'm dead serious. I wish there were more lists to make! /End psycho Laramie x Listing rant

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Post by Topaztan on 23/04/13, 01:48 pm

I'M NOT LAUGHING AT YOU TO BE MEAN, I PROMISE! I BEG FOR FORGIVENESS.

Well, everyone has their hobbies, you're is just OCD listing. I think Laramie x Listing is the new ultimate OTP though. I'm sure we can think of topics for you to list things on~. THERE WILL ALWAYS BE MORE.

You should know though that I really appreciate your lists and I bet a lot of other people here do, they make things super convenient and clear!

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Post by Eryx on 23/04/13, 05:39 pm

Topaztan wrote:AHAHHAHA, LARAMIE YOU AND YOUR LISTS. <3

Hyperbending Body wrote:
There was also a term to describe athletic bishous, i forgot though sad
Sports-baka? I think I know which term you're thinking of but I don't remember at the moment either...

I'd add...

Friendship end: where the relationship doesn't work romantically but the two remain friends. (sometimes also a a path without romancing a male and just becoming best friends with another female.)

Reverse Harem/Harem: Where groups of the opposite gender flock around one person.

Otoge: "short" way of saying otome.

I can't think of anything, LOL

I read somewhere that Otoge is also used for rhythm games? :O
Or Otoge can be used in either of them? It is also called Otomege sometimes.

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Post by Blue_Sargent on 23/04/13, 06:21 pm

When I was a newbie, I wondered what "CG" means smile To me those were just "stills"...

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Post by Makise Sunao on 23/04/13, 09:53 pm

Thank you for the wonderful outputs ladies!


Eryx wrote:I read somewhere that Otoge is also used for rhythm games? :O
Or Otoge can be used in either of them? It is also called Otomege sometimes.
Otoge/Otomege is a shortcut for Otome Games. Boys abbreviate Bishoujo games as Bishouge (a play word of Visual Eroge (Visual Ero-ge))

Friendship end: where the relationship doesn't work romantically but the two remain friends. (sometimes also a a path without romancing a male and just becoming best friends with another female.)
It's considered as normal end :D

I need definition for Ore-sama and Ouji-sama and sports baka smile)

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Post by spicy_diamond on 23/04/13, 11:38 pm

Seems like we could probably also add a Best End to our ends list. More recently, it seems like they really try and break it down to at least give you the three big ends.

Best/Renai End
Good/Friendship End
Bad End

For good terms to know we might also add:

Protagonist (主人公)
Because while everyone knows what a protagonist is, I don't know about you guys, but when I first started out for the longest time I was convinced that 主人公 must either be a really popular name or that it must be kanji for [insert name here] XD

Bacouple (バカップル)
Japanese portmanteau combining 'baka' and 'couple' used as slang to indicate a ridiculously lovey-dovey couple.

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Post by Sakimichi on 24/04/13, 12:34 am

I have something to add------
How about Sleeping bishies (Nemuri ouji right? or is there another term for that...)
then Sportsfreak..we need to add those too yay!

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Post by Topaztan on 24/04/13, 02:14 am

Eryx wrote:
Topaztan wrote:

Otoge: "short" way of saying otome.

I read somewhere that Otoge is also used for rhythm games? :O
Or Otoge can be used in either of them? It is also called Otomege sometimes.

Isn't Otomege used for otome games with eroge content? I'm not sure, though I have headed otoge is used for rhythm game as well. I think it has something to do with the way the words are spelled in Japanese.

So I did a quick google search and I got this explanation.

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Post by Loren Leah on 24/04/13, 02:28 am

Topaztan wrote:
Eryx wrote:
Topaztan wrote:

Otoge: "short" way of saying otome.

I read somewhere that Otoge is also used for rhythm games? :O
Or Otoge can be used in either of them? It is also called Otomege sometimes.

Isn't Otomege used for otome games with eroge content? I'm not sure, though I have headed otoge is used for rhythm game as well. I think it has something to do with the way the words are spelled in Japanese.

So I did a quick google search and I got this explanation.
Otomege (乙女ゲー) and otoge (乙ゲー) are interchangeable. Personally I tend to see otomege used more often in Japanese fandom and otoge more often over here. (I prefer otoge myself, it's cuter and shorter haha)

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default Re: The Otome Gaming Jargon

Post by Laramie Castiel on 24/04/13, 03:59 am

Topaztan wrote:I'M NOT LAUGHING AT YOU TO BE MEAN, I PROMISE! I BEG FOR FORGIVENESS.

No need to beg! I was never angry at you, my love~<3 Thanks for your kind words, also.

To clarify, there are no differences between "otoge" and its original form, "otome game", just as Loren Leah said.

As for otoge meaning both "ongaku game" and "otome game", that is correct, but which definition to use is entirely depended on context, of course. I've written in a defintion of "ongaku game", and that touches upon its shortened forms.

============================================================

ADV/AVG
ADV the shortened from "adventure" and AVG is the shortened form of "adventure game". ADV is popular format of visual novels that are also the most common released every year. ADVs are characterised by little-to-no interactive gameplay, centrering around a "choose-your-own-adventure" narrative style. The player is intermittently prompted to make decisions from a set group of choices to advance the plot and eventually reach an ending. The amount and frequency of choices vary from game-to-game. ADVs always feature multiple endings, and are widely loved by its fans because of its high replay value. Again, the amount of endings are dependent upon each game.

Banchou (番長)
A banchou is a leader of a group of yankee.

Bara (薔薇)
Bara refers to male-on-male media typically made by and for homosexual men. In bara works, the artistic designs of the men tend to be muscular and their personalities more traditionally masculine. The word itself literally means "rose" in Japanese.

Bijo (美女)
Meaning "beautiful woman" in Japanese, bijo is a word used to describe a beautiful female, regardless of her age.

Bishoujo (美少女)
The word literally means "beautiful young girl". It is a Japanese word that refers to
attractive young women. A young woman can be a different "type" of attractive (cute, sexy, etc.) and still be correctly referred to as a bishoujo. In the Western fandom, bishoujo is used to describe a lady as attractive regardless of her age, but the more correct term for a beautiful "older" lady would be "bijo", which is a general term to refer to an attractive woman.

Bishoujo Game (美少女ゲーム)
Also known as galge. Meaning "pretty girl game" in Japanese, a bishoujo game is a subgenre of visual novels and dating sims that feature bishoujo girls as obtainable love interests. Bishoujo games are marketed towards a heterosexual male demographic. It is important to note that not all bishoujo games feature pornographic content. For example, Clannad, a very popular bishoujo game visual novel, is for all ages. Even though it was targeted towards a heterosexual male audience, its widespread popularity eventually boasted a varied demographic of fans.

Dojikko (ドジっ子; ドジっ娘)
A dojikko is a female character that is clumsy, but rather than being a flaw, it is seen or played as more of an endearing trait. Though a feminine term, it is not uncommon to see clumsy male characters being referred to as a dojikko by their female fans. The word is a mashup of the Japanese words, "ドジ (clumsy)" and "子 (child)"/"娘 (young girl)".

Donkan (鈍感; ドンカン)
Means "thickheadedness; emotionally dense" in Japanese. In other words, a donkan character tends to be slow on the uptake with jokes, doesn't realise when somebody has feelings for another (including themselves) and doesn't always realise they've been insulted. The donkan character archetype is a popular choice of protagonists for many visual novels.

Eroge (エロゲ; エロゲー)
An eroge is a genre and a general term of reference to visual novels and dating sims for adults that feature pornographic content in an anime style. Nearly all of the "obtainable" characters are bishoujo and bishounen. Because of how much of a blanket term eroge is, most prefer to market their releases through its subgenres. Examples being nukige and calling otome games for adults "R18+ otome games" rather than just "eroge". The word is a portmanteau of "erotic game".

Fujoshi (腐女子)
Literally meaning "rotten girl", a fujoshi is a fan of media featuring yaoi. Fujoshi is sometimes seen as the female equivalent of "otaku", but this is inaccurate. As well as being fans of yaoi, fujoshi are just as well known for their prolificness in creating doujins/fanworks of established series pairing canon male characters together- a lot of the time, of a pornographic nature. Unlike otaku, which is a term that was never intended to be negative, fujoshi is a self-mocking term, created by fans of yaoi.

Though not nearly as stigmatised as otaku are, fujoshi are steadily gaining unpopularity. A couple of crimes have made fujoshi stereotyped to be much creepier than their jocular beginnings. One is the incident in which a middle-aged (alleged) fujoshi threated a school and male seiyuu, Hayami Shou, with knives. Another incident was where Tachibana Shinnosuke, a popular seiyuu amongst fujoshi, begged his fans to stop stalking him after many of them orchestrated "accidental encounters" with him.

Gal Game (ギャルゲーム)
Gal game means "girl game" in Japanese. It's much more commonly shortened to "galge (ギャルゲ; ギャルゲー)". Galge is a synonym for bishoujo game. Please scroll back above and read the entry for "bishoujo game" for more details.

Moe (萌え)
Moe is a very broad term to describe a character (usually female) that is cute and tickles one's protective instincts. The word "moe" in Japanese means to "sprout; bud". Moe also can be used to describe a media that induces such feelings in you, or media that features many "moe" characters. A very popular example of a "moe" anime is K-On!

The application of "moe" to a character is acceptable to be subjective about it, but there are also thought to be specific patterns or personality traits a character must possess in order to "qualify". For female characters, the popular consensus is that they must be cute and young. Clumsiness, density, innocence and quirkiness are also desirable "moe" traits.

Nekketsu (熱血)
"Nekketsu" means "hot-blooded" in Japanese. There are no significant differences
between what a hot-blooded character is like in Japanese media vs. Western media.

Ongaku Game (音楽ゲーム; おんがくゲーム)
Means "music game" in Japanese. Often shortened to "otoge (音ゲー; おとゲー)" or
"onge (おんゲー)". Also known as a "rhythm game (リズムゲーム)". An ongaku game is
a type of computer game in which the gameplay is centred around keeping in rhythm with the music in order to progress. Popular examples include Konami's Dance Dance Revolution franchise, and Nintendo's Rhytm Tengoku (Rhythm Heaven) series. Be careful to not confuse otoge with "otome game", as both share the same shortened form.

Ore-sama (俺様; オレ様)
Ore-sama is a term used to refer to overconfident and/or pompous male characters. The term comes from the Japanese masculine pronoun for "I; me (俺 or オレ)" and the very respectful honorific suffix, "-sama". As such, the majority of ore-sama type characters use "ore-sama", which is the most arrogant way a male can refer to himself. Other than being overconfident and pompous, ore-sama characters are also known to be boastful, hasty and having a "my way or the highway" attitude. More common amongst villainous characters.

Otaku (おたく; オタク; ヲタク)
An often misapplied and misused term, otaku is derived from the Japanese word, "お宅 (an honorific used to refer to another's family or house)". However, in this context (written as "おたく; オタク; ヲタク" to avoid confusion with "お宅"), it simply refers to somebody that has an extreme interest in their hobby/interest. In more modern times, the term has come to be near-exclusively used to describe those that are obsessed with anime, manga, video games and/or visual novels. Though the definition itself is neutral- being neither positive nor negative- otaku is commonly viewed as an insult. There are a myriad of reasons why otaku are "silently" discriminated against in Japan and received its negative connotation. Some small reasons being their supposed tendencies to be asocial, hikkikomori, NEETs, unkempt, etc. As for why otaku get quickly categorised as a "creep" is explained in fantastic detail by a Japanese otaku here(may be graphic for some, please be aware!), but I'll simplify it way more for this post.

PLEASE BE WARNE
D:
I will briefly discuss some details about graphic crimes, so if you're sensitive to these matters, be mindful of this before you decide to read!
Spoiler:

Very basically, in 1988~'89, one of the most infamous crimes in Japanese history was committed by an alledgedly "lolicon" anime otaku named Miyazaki Tsutomu. He murdered four girls aged between 4~7 and even cannibalised, drank the blood of, raped and/or sexually mutilated some of them. In addition to those atrocities, he burned the skull of one of his victims to ash, sent them back to her parents and left a note that read, "Mari, Body Ashes, Burned, Evidence, Proof". He then sent letters to newspapers detailing graphically how he murdered his victims. After Mari's funeral,
he sent a letter to Mari's family and the newspapers that read, "I deeply appreciate the proper burial that you were able to provide her that I could not."
After Miyazaki was apprehended, numerous hentai (anime pornography) videos of lolicon and/or violent nature was supposedly found in a search of his home (alongside videos of himself committing the crimes). Needless to say, the public went mad, and a moral panic towards otaku spreads through the country. Years on, the panic disappeared, but the image that otaku are "creepy loners/f***ed up/lolicon freaks" remains.

Ouji-sama (王子様; おうじ様)
Ouji-sama is literally the Japanese for very respectfully addressing or referring to a prince. Even so, not all ouji-sama characters are princes or even royalty. This character archetype is more referential to the stereotypes associated with a prince: "pretty boy" attractiveness, gentlemanliness, politeness, wealth, high social standing (through nobility or popularity), a silver tongue and/or even knightly virtues if the universe the character is in permits. It is not uncommon for ouji-sama characters to also be combined with the "playboy" stereotype; however, the ouji-sama is much more savoury about his trysts.

Shoujo-ai (少女愛)
Meaning "young girl love", shoujo-ai is the term used to describe works that focuses on the romantic emotional developments between lesbians. At most, shoujo-ai may contain implied sex, but never anything pornographic.

Shounen-ai (少年愛)
Meaning "young boy love" in Japanese, shounen-ai refers to media that has an emphasis on the romantic emotional developments between men. It differentiates from yaoi by not including sex, but it can sometimes contain references to implied sex.

Sports-baka (スポーツ馬鹿; -バカ)
A sports-baka is a character whom is totally devoted to and loves sports. The term itself can encompass a lover of any type of sport. Stereotypically, a sports-baka excels in any manner of sporting or physical activity, but tends to not be booksmart or even smart full stop. Sometimes, some people will specify the type of sport the
character is devoted to. For example, soccer-baka and tennis-baka. The word comes from combining "sports" and the Japanese word, "馬鹿 (fool; idiot; stupid)".

Yankee (ヤンキー)
Yankee is used to describe an individual who is a juvenile delinquent. Without
application to a person, yankee on its own refers to delinquency in general.

Yaoi (ヤオイ; やおい)
Yaoi is a term used to describe male-on-male homoerotic pornography created by and for heterosexual females. The term derived from "(山[場]なし, 落ちなし, 意味なし), which translates to "No peak, no fall, no meaning"; describing yaoi's focus on the sexual aspects. For the term used to describe male-on-male media that focuses more on the emotional aspects, "shounen-ai" is used.

Yuri (百合; ユリ; ゆり)
Yuri a term coined by the anime fandom to refer to media with a focus on lesbian pornography and/or themes. Yuri can also have focuses on emotional developments, which is often categorised as "shoujo-ai". The word means "lily" in Japanese.


Last edited by Laramie Castiel on 24/04/13, 04:35 am; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Added a few more.)

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Post by Topaztan on 24/04/13, 04:51 am

SASUGA LARAMIE. <3
I learn something new everyday because of your lists.

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Post by Laramie Castiel on 24/04/13, 04:54 am

*Bows* Why thank you, my waifu~<3

It was a lot of fun surfing the net when I was double-checking some terms. I came across some really interesting stuff. :)

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Post by Eryx on 24/04/13, 05:31 am

Thanks for the clarification! ^_^
Oh and thank you for the list Laramie! Your lists are interesting reads. :D

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Post by Laramie Castiel on 24/04/13, 05:38 am

Thank you, Eryx! I try, I try~ [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.] OMG, THERE ARE SO MANY NEW EMOTICONS!

I've just thought of a few more, so I may post again or just edit my second post.

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